What is Freemasonry?

Freemasonry teaches moral lessons and self-knowledge through participation in a progression of allegorical two-part plays, which are learnt by heart and performed within each lodge.

Freemasonry offers its members an approach to life which seeks to reinforce thoughtfulness for others, kindness in the community, honesty in business, courtesy in society and fairness in all things. Members are urged to regard the interests of the family as paramount, but importantly, Freemasonry also teaches and practises concern for people, care for the less fortunate and help for those in need.

Three Ideals of Freemasonry

The first of the great Pillars of Society carried beyond the dictionary meaning of Soundness of judgement in matters relating to life and conduct, knowledge, experience and learning, depicted in Freemasonry by the Doric order of Architecture.

Besides playing a prominent part in political emancipation many Masons were also active in promoting freedom of speech and belief. The fundamental principles on which the Craft is based encourages constant exercise of the creative and intellectual faculties so as to improve and enrich the quality of human life. The roll-call of Masonic authors is a long and impressive one and includes literary giants like Rudyard Kipling, Anthony Trollope and Mark Twain.

The second great Pillar, depicted by the Ionic order of Architecture, is Strength of purpose, and the quality of life we expect for ourselves and those less fortunate in the world around us.

Freemasons have contributed much to the welfare of humankind in different ways. Since its beginning, Masons have excelled in several diverse fields such as architecture, commerce, diplomacy, education and exploration.

A prominent Freemason in South East Asia, who exhibited great strength in character and whose action greatly benefited the peoples in this part of the world was Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles (1781- 1826). He joined the East India Company as a very young man and in 1805 was sent to Penang as assistant secretary to the first Governor. In 1819 he acquired the island of Singapore for the East India Company and founded Singapore, laying the foundations of the great international trading centre and City State that it is today. He was initiated in Java a few months after the British conquest of the island in 1812.

The third Pillar of Freemasonry, or the Corinthian order which is Beauty, refers to the perfected Soul. A quality that every Mason should strive to manifest to himself and in every aspect of his life. The keywords for Beauty are Balance and Harmony. Beauty and Harmony can be conveyed through the senses. Through the ear alone we can enjoy the pure pleasure of music. Through the visual sense we can appreciate the various performing arts like ballet and opera. And finally, we can undergo the intellectual and imaginative pleasures of the written word.

Many Freemasons who have risen to prominence in the field of music have openly acknowledged the role played by the Craft in their lives. Wolfgang Amaedeus Mozart, the supreme musical genius of the Enlightenment, saw Freemasonry as an essential part of his life in Vienna. Mozart’s work includes at least a dozen Masonically inspired compositions including his greatest opera, the “Magic Flute”

WISDOM

The first of the great Pillars of Society carried beyond the dictionary meaning of Soundness of judgement in matters relating to life and conduct, knowledge, experience and learning, depicted in Freemasonry by the Doric order of Architecture.

Besides playing a prominent part in political emancipation many Masons were also active in promoting freedom of speech and belief. The fundamental principles on which the Craft is based encourages constant exercise of the creative and intellectual faculties so as to improve and enrich the quality of human life. The roll-call of Masonic authors is a long and impressive one and includes literary giants like Rudyard Kipling, Anthony Trollope and Mark Twain.

STRENGTH

The second great Pillar, depicted by the Ionic order of Architecture, is Strength of purpose, and the quality of life we expect for ourselves and those less fortunate in the world around us.

Freemasons have contributed much to the welfare of humankind in different ways. Since its beginning, Masons have excelled in several diverse fields such as architecture, commerce, diplomacy, education and exploration.

A prominent Freemason in South East Asia, who exhibited great strength in character and whose action greatly benefited the peoples in this part of the world was Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles (1781- 1826). He joined the East India Company as a very young man and in 1805 was sent to Penang as assistant secretary to the first Governor. In 1819 he acquired the island of Singapore for the East India Company and founded Singapore, laying the foundations of the great international trading centre and City State that it is today. He was initiated in Java a few months after the British conquest of the island in 1812.

BEAUTY

The third Pillar of Freemasonry, or the Corinthian order which is Beauty, refers to the perfected Soul. A quality that every Mason should strive to manifest to himself and in every aspect of his life. The keywords for Beauty are Balance and Harmony. Beauty and Harmony can be conveyed through the senses. Through the ear alone we can enjoy the pure pleasure of music. Through the visual sense we can appreciate the various performing arts like ballet and opera. And finally, we can undergo the intellectual and imaginative pleasures of the written word.

Many Freemasons who have risen to prominence in the field of music have openly acknowledged the role played by the Craft in their lives. Wolfgang Amaedeus Mozart, the supreme musical genius of the Enlightenment, saw Freemasonry as an essential part of his life in Vienna. Mozart’s work includes at least a dozen Masonically inspired compositions including his greatest opera, the “Magic Flute”